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Showing posts with label Power View. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Power View. Show all posts

Saturday, January 21, 2012

Microsoft BI: Hands-on with SQL Server 2012 Power View

Power View is a Web browser-based report authoring tool targeted at everyone to enable them to create compelling, interactive and rich data visualizations based on Tabular BI Semantic Models. Steps below are based on the SQL Server 2012 hands-on labs.

Start by going to the SharePoint 2010 Central Administration:

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Go to Application Management>Create site collection

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Title: TailspinToysBI

URL:TailspinToysBI

Template>Enterprise: Business Intelligence Center

Primary Site Collection Administrator: administrator

The site is created:

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Under Centeral Administration>Site Settings>Features, ensure PowerPivot Administrative feature is enabled. If not ‘Activate’ it.

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To create a new PowerPivot Gallery, Under Site Actions, select More Actions and select

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Create a PowerPivot Gallery:

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Now it is time to explore the Power View Design Environment.  Let’s start by uploading a PowerPivot workbook to the gallery.

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On the Library Tools Documents tab, inside the New group, click Upload Document. Choose Tailspin Toys Sales Model.xlsx from C:\SQL2012DEVKITRCO\Labs\PowerView.

Now it is time to explore the PowerView designer:

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This will take us to the PowerView designer:

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The first thing we will do is save the report. File>Save as

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A Power View report is saved to a SharePoint library using a variation of Report Definition Language (RDL). It is saved as a document with an .rdlx extension.

Back under the Home Ribbon, note that this is a WYSIWYG (What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get) designer that supports an interactive design and data exploration experience. To the right of the report designer is the Field List that it exposes the tabular BI Semantic Model that initially consists of a list of tables.

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The icons you see next to the SKU and Product Name fields indicate that they represent values at the lowest granularity of the table. Model developers can mark fields as label fields to help Power View users understand that these fields can be used to see all entries of the table, and to ensure they group appropriately.

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Let’s start creating a report by adding a title.

Click on Product and note that the table is added to the report:

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Under the Design tab, change the view to Card type and note the change to the report.

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Resize the table so that as shown below to make vertical space in the page.

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Now let’s add another table for Demographic and Revenue. Click anywhere on the page and choose Product>Demographic and Sales>Revenue.

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Now let’s add a Bubble Chart with Sum of Quantity and Product Category. Click anywhere in the designer and choose Product>ProductCategory and Sales>Quantity.

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Goto Design>Chart and select Scatter. Fill out the Scatter Chart attributes as follows:

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Under the play axis, drag and drop the month.

Expanding the Chart shows as follows:

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Note you can animate the chart

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Now, let’s add a Tile View to the first table we added to the PowerView report:

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On the Card Tools Design ribbon tab, select Tiles. On the Design Ribbon, select Cover Flow under the Tile Visualizations section

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Under Product>Image>select Add as Tile By.

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Save the report and we’re done.

Here is the final view of the report that shows what is possible with PowerView:

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Tuesday, January 17, 2012